Blue Skull

A large spray painted graffiti of a blue skull

Still mining the archives as the pandemic keeps on going. Here’s a large piece from somewhere in Brooklyn. There’s some nice shading under the eye sockets. The attempt to add a devil lock of hair doesn’t quite work in terms of the perspective, but I still like it. This particular shade of blue isn’t one you see very often either.

Brooklyn, New York

Positivity

White cursive graffiti spraypaint of the phrase, "I like you!" on a green construction board

More unseen gems from the archive. This morning a bit of positivity with your typography. I can only imagine that it’s quite difficult to freehand write cursive this large — and to do it with a bit of style. Check the little serif connector on the letter “y”. Gorgeous. I also remember a bit of photographer’s conceit as I tried to line up the construction light with the exclamation point.

Manhattan, NYC

Glamour

A glamorous paste up graphic of a blonde woman wearing a bowler hat and old style tuxedo

Another piece from the deep archives. This is a closeup of a wheat pasted cut out printed on the bottom of a traffic pole. Beyond the glamour of the colors, there’s a distinct attitude in the position of her head and in her eyes. A wariness perhaps as she seems to be turning away but not looking away. Wearing men’s clothes but with red lipstick, she captures (demands?) the masculine without relinquishing the feminine.

Brooklyn, NYC

The Door

Red door with white spray paint pattern graffiti

Digging through the archives recently and I found this photo of a door from sometime in 2012. I love the minimal pattern, much of it single line, along with the loose flow of the lines. There’s a distinct improvised, on-the-spot feel to the piece.

Manhattan.

Understanding

Spray paint graffiti of a pattern and a broken black heart with the phrase, "Love is key 2 super understanding"

One final piece from this pandemic plywood series. This one with a mix of things going on — the blue cover up, the pattern, the tag overlay, the phrase (stenciled?) and the broken black heart. A good use of the plywood as a reversed color in the pattern versus the heart where instead of drawing two halves, it’s a single heart split with gold. Perhaps that’s the whole point — the pattern of whole things broken and super understanding.

Soho, Manhattan.