Unsmilely

Unsmilely Icon Set

There’s a natural ebb and flow to projects. An initial burst of inspiration creating momentum that slowly fades as the hard work and all too often, the insecurity sets in. This is one of those projects.

Originally drawn in 2017, it’s hard to recall the exact source of inspiration, but in hindsight, they seem a reaction to both the political landscape at the time as well as the sugar saturation of skeuomorphism in the standard emoji world. Like in my symbology project, these are a study in the reduction of the extraneous to reveal the core.

I think the other goal, given their simplicity, was always to animate them. The only question, and this is where the project ebb started, was how to best create the animation. And so, what started out as an excuse to learn new software applications — a tedious task which sucked any joy out of the project via frustration — led to stagnation. It was only recently when my web work sparked the idea of animating these via CSS. Now, there was still a ton of learning to do with this CSS only approach, but at least I had a stronger foundation having done it before with small things and these icons are in essence, a gr0up of small things.

Here’s a quick video demo of the animation.

 

And for those more inclined, here’s a Codepen with all the HTML/CSS.

See the Pen
Unsmilely Icon #1
by strongest (@strongest)
on CodePen.

The full collection on Codepen is available here: https://codepen.io/collection/XjoBzV

Or download the complete set to get the images.

Bad Form

Bad Form

 

In these heady days of web design and development, with multiple screen sizes, tablets and smarphones, it can be difficult to get proportions and spacing correct. Of course, one would expect a major retailer to have the resources (and care) to get it right. This screenshot was taken on my laptop with a resolution of 1440 x 900 running Firefox 5 on OSX. Nothing too crazy in terms of a web user profile.

Beyond any aesthetic issues with the check box label being too far to the right, the functional issues (or non-functional as the case may be) are what should be of primary concern here. I suspect many users would stumble over connecting these two parts of the form. If it takes folks an extra few seconds to fill out your form, it takes away from the shopping experience and therefore it impacts your brand.

Will it take away from sales? Maybe not initially. I certainly continued with my purchase, but if users are left remembering that the checkout process was annoying, weird, or heaven forbid, difficult, they may be more likely to head to your competitor’s better designed site.

Small improvements can build up to increase satisfaction and in this case, it seems like an important (and easy) fix – especially as this is one of the very last steps in the check out process – right before you click the “purchase” button.

Seems simple enough – in both common sense and in design – but the evidence is clear.